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-- [inaudible] the serious threat assessment our threat environment is changing. threats are more interconnected and viral. defense which it first -- disruption with the u.s national interest. i would ketrn to a few of the issues e identify in the statement for the record. our statement to the lead was cyber. as mor more state and demonstrate actors gained expertise. it's important to reach a global threat cannot be overstated. this year our discussion natural resources also more prominent because climb in disease and competition for natural resources and huge national security implications. many import are extreme war and food stress that can destablize governments that can trigger conflict. on the issue of terrorism, the threat from al qaeda and the potential for a massive coordinated attack on the united may be diminished. but it's more diffuse. as the president stated on tuesday about the boston marathon bombing we don't know it was planned by an group effort or individual act. lone inspire our affiliated group are determined to attack. the turmoil in the arab world brought a spike in threat
of exchanges going on right now. forward to a post 2013 environment, to you believe these multibillion-dollar payments will continue regardless of their being an american presence or nato troop presence in afghanistan? maintaineve we need to a constructive and effective relationship with pakistan. we need to recognize the real threat that pakistan has inside of its own borders. from my perspective we have to do whatever it takes to ensure that our national vital interests is protected. >> one of the things i am always looking into that aid is whether or not it does serve the military. you are saying we need to do whatever it takes to continue that relationship. are you saying that payments of that size and nature are going to be what is required in the long run? >> i believe it is in our best interest to continue to develop the pakistani army in ensuring that they can effectively deal issues in their borders. i cannot tell you that every program we have in place is one we ought to assisting in the future. that is not something i paying particular attention to in my current duties. i am
... are polluting our environment. [ sniffing ] [ seagulls squawking ] [cheers and applause] >> jon: welcome back. we're here with former president jimmy carter. it must be interesting for you. you were president 1976 to 1980. you know, during that time you had a very difficult time with crazy north korea leader that you had to try toll negotiate out developing nuclear weapons. >> yes. >> jon: there was an invasion of afghanistan that you had to take a stand on. does it ever strike you as -- so have we moved nowhere? are we just gerbils running on a wheel? [laughter] this is the third generation of kims that is -- then the forth the kardashian. [ laughter ] that are using sort of nuclear threat to gain some type of attention. >> well, when bill clinton was president, i went over to north korea because we were faced with a war between north korea and south creal. i noilgted with the seen -- south korea. i negotiated with the senior kim who was worshiped like jesus christ and george washington combined. they would do anything he said. we negotiated for a number of hours. he agreed with everything i
store and there are issues i have about consumer protection in that environment. while i appreciate, it is a concept that could work, we need strategies that are going to take into consideration varying factors and that the goal here, and in addition to being able to be in the black, is that, you have a public service and we have to serve these con at this time cents. i would really encourage you with your leadership on the board of governors to really think about ways that are going to be unique, more than just flexibility to get there. that you're looking at quality, connectivity, those relationships, the rural fabric in these states, related to the post office. when i was in inaing the postal service was a very effective partner in receiving those constituents, thank you. i yield back. >> thank you. and recognize the gentleman from mr. georgia. >> thank you, mr. chairman. just in listening and writing down notes, we went all over the map from the importance of postal service. i don't think anybody will detract from that. we talked before. you been in committees before. i serve an
. as of today this report will hopefully put into focus some of the actions taken in the post 9/11 environment. there are some key questions we wanted to address this morning. one, did the treatment of suspected terrorists and u.s. custody rise to the left of torture? second how did this happen and what can we learn from this to make better decisions to the future. we found the u.s. personnel in many instances used interrogation techniques on detainee's that constitute torture. american personnel conducted an even larger number of interrogations' with kroll and humane degrading treatment. both categories of actions violate u.s. law and international treaty obligations this conclusion is and based upon our own personal impressions, but rather grounded in a thorough and detailed examination of what constitutes the torture from a historical and legal context. we looked at court cases and determined that the treatment of detainees and many instances met the standards. the courts have determined constituting torture. but you look at the united states state department and its annual country reports
may also be a constraining factor. living in a bad home environment can be a big distraction. budget cuts is probably the worst problem of all. >> scheduled cuts that would take place unless congress acts would mean 8.2% cuts. >> cut. >> yes, cut. and these aren't just dollar signs in percent. they are children's futures. >> programs are designed to pick up the slack for kids whose needs aren't being met. all of those programs are designed to deliver needs of children not being met by the larger system. to cut seven point eight percent would have an incredible impact on students across america. >> before we fix the educational system, we need to find out what meets [indiscernible] >> we do have room for improvement. one of the areas that we are weak in is allowing students the opportunity to be creative in their learning and for us to decided relevance for students. with the advent of technologies, students don't teachers foreed information. they can go to the internet and get answers. but what they do need teachers for his what information is relevant? what information is accurate?
easy. it is challenging in this fiscal environment. administrations 39 budget -- $39 million budget request. consistent with what congress appropriated in 2013 for the department before sequestration cuts were applied. the level of funding in this budget is lower than what congress appropriated in 2009. stepping back and thinking of the challenges that our country and this department has faced since 2009, times square bombing, hurricane sandy, the ever-changing and growing cyber threat, and of the boston attack, it is easy to become concerned with this budget request. we are facing extremely difficult budgetary times. sacrifices must be made. they may not receive all of the funding. and agencies in government must share in the sacrifice to some extent required during this deficit. our secretary seems to have taken this message to heart. he is identified $1.3 billion in savings this year and more than $4 billion since 2009. he continues to move from a risk-based approach and it effort to save more money. i'm happy to see this budget proposes a much-needed increase for cybersecurity,
work environment, that their paychecks will arrive on time and the benefits they earn are the ones they receive. under president clinton, john served as deputy assistant secretary and acting assistant secretary for law enforcement at the treasury department. overseeing the united states secret service and the bureau of alcohol, tobacco and firearms. and he later moved to the interior department where he was assistant secretary for policy, management and budget, essentially the manager of the department of interior. before coming to the office of personnel management, john spent nearly a decade working on conservation as director of the fish and wildlife foundation, and then arguably the job he perhaps has enjoyed most, he became director of the national zoo. at the national zoo, he was so successful turning around a faltering institution that after he left they named a lion in his honor. john indeed was a lion, a lion on behalf of the federal employees, a lion on behalf of good government, a lion on behalf of integrity. john know he is a true leader and manager and an incredibly wa
and the reason is because the environment had so radically changed in a very short period of time. that's one of the things i detail. >> when we look at hawaii now we don't see that. we see the plantations and that sort of thing. so, t.d.? >> what i found out when i was researching this book is the paradise like other things is an intellectual and social construct and just as there is a paper trail in the spanish illusion that gold was to be found in florida, by the way i just want to clarify one thing it begins with the first massacre of white men in the western hemisphere certainly and north america and this is how our history began with a spanish learned there was nothing to be found. it was only tradition in florida, that was before they found out that they had established a settlement in jacksonville so they tore across the atlantic and massacred several hundred frenchmen and that is the beginning of the history. as i say in the beginning if we look at -- for this old guy looking for viagra and largely america thinks here comes a hurricane this is no understanding, but if you look at the
, but in this environment, the one thing i would ask for is more latitude in how we take the cut to fit the money with the most important payoff is. with respect to the question you raised, it is an age-old one and intelligence. the approach or try to take in the last two years is try to protect and invest in capabilities that give us the most general coverage. that's why a very strong on sustaining our overhead reconnaissance capability because it covers the earth, denied area or not and similarly, even when times are then, human capability is extremely important. that's when the hu what dr. vickers are io brilliae as much as it is a reshaping, recastg he organization i started in 1992 caughhet t defense humanrvice. better integration with the fbi and the cia. more clandestine case officer's who are worth their weight in gold. the unique capability no one else can render. as they make reductions, we have to focus much much more on quality, quality of investment since are not going to have in numbers. >> one quick question that's come up a number of times. and there is clear evidence, public evid
carbon pollution in the environment than we have in nearly 20 years, but we understand this is not enough. we've got to do better, and that's why we've got to pursue an all of the above numbering strategy that includes investing in more biofuels and more fuel efficient vehicles and more solar and wind power and more people going back to work building cars and homes and businesses that are more energy efficient than the ones we've got right now. that's why i've proposed new job-creating investments in science and innovation. and all these young people, as young as they are, they're all going to be going to college, and a lot of them are going to want to continue to pursue tear research and pursue their dreams. and if there is not the research grant pipeline in place, many of them will not have the resources to invent and discover the things that will make us healthier and make us more energy efficient and improve the quality of our lives. so this is not the time to gut investments that keep our businesses on the cutting edge. that keep our economy humming, that improving, you know, the qua
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11